Author: Jann Parry

A long-established dance writer, Jann Parry was dance critic for The Observer from 1983 to 2004 and wrote the award-winning biography of choreographer Kenneth MacMillan: 'Different Drummer', Faber and Faber, 2009. She has written for publications including The Spectator, The Listener, About the House (Royal Opera House magazine), Dance Now, Dance Magazine (USA), Stage Bill (USA) and Dancing Times. As a writer/producer she worked for the BBC World Service from 1970 to 1989, covering current affairs and the arts. As well as producing radio programmes she has contributed to television and radio documentaries about dance and dancers.

Under are the articles written for DanceTabs. Reviews on Balletco
Yijing Zhang, Céline Gittens, Matthias Dingman and Tyrone Singleton in Jessica Lang’s Wink.© Andy Ross. (Click image for larger version)

Birmingham Royal Ballet – Wink, The Moor’s Pavane, The Shakespeare Suite – London

★★★★✰   Wink, best seen from above, is a valuable addition to BRB’s repertoire. So is José Limon’s The Moor’s Pavane, created in 1949.

Poster for the film Dancer staring Sergei Polunin.© West End Films. (Click image for larger version)

Film: “Dancer” – Sergei Polunin documentary

“Dancer” has been given a few screenings in London, most recently as part of the BFI London Film Festival, with Polunin and the director, Steven Cantor, in attendance for Q&A sessions…

Iain Mackay (Prospero) in David Bintley's The Tempest.© Dave Morgan. (Click image for larger version)

Birmingham Royal Ballet – The Tempest – London

★★★✰✰   Bintley has treated Shakespeare’s drama as a masque, full of spectacle, music and dancing, with elusive characters that are more allegorical than realistic. It doesn’t work as a narrative ballet because the sub-plots are too complicated…

Edd Mitton, Amy Thake and Ben Warbis in Kenneth MacMillan's Sea of Troubles.© Dave Morgan. (Click image for larger version)

Yorke Dance Project – Rewind Forward: Sea of Troubles, Self, Twilight, Lacrymosa, Untethered – London

★★★✰✰   Yorke Dance Project is unusual, among small modern dance companies, in its respect for musicality and for the demands it makes for skilled partnering.

Osbert Lancaster's front screen for Frederick Ashton's La Fille mal gardée.© Dave Morgan, courtesy the Royal Opera House. (Click image for larger version)

Royal Ballet – La Fille mal gardée – London

★★★★✰   Early arrivals for the opening night of the Royal Ballet’s autumn season could watch Peregrine the pony being escorted to the stage door in readiness for his role in La Fille mal gardée…

Jamar Roberts in Rennie Harris' Exodus.© Foteini Christofilopoulou. (Click image for larger version)

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater – Programmes A and B – London

★★★★✰   Revelations is always a joy, however often one sees it. Ailey’s choreography, influenced by his mentor, Lester Horton, and Martha Graham, is a reminder of how potent that modern dance technique could be.

Cassandra Trenary in The Sleeping Beauty.© John Grigaitis. (Click image for larger version)

American Ballet Theatre – Sleeping Beauty – Paris

★★★✰✰   I was eager to see American Ballet Theatre’s Sleeping Beauty, mounted by Alexei Ratmansky last year, because of the enthusiastic reviews it has received in the United States. The Paris premiere, however, met with muted acclaim…

Book cover - Peter Wright: Wrights and Wrongs – my life in dance.© Oberon Books. (Click image for larger version)

Book – Peter Wright: Wrights and Wrongs – my life in dance

His is an insider’s account, complete with waspish comments and cameos of the famous people he encountered…

Igor Tsvirko and Ekaterina Krysanova in Flames of Paris.© Dave Morgan. (Click image for larger version)

Bolshoi Ballet – The Flames of Paris – London

★★★★✰   The great pleasure of Alexei Ratmansky’s version of Vasily Vainonen’s 1932 ballet is the cornucopia of steps to which both choreographers had access: danse d’école, folk and character dances, as well as expressive acting.

Jonathan Goddard, Patricia Okenwa, Clemmie Sveaas, Alexander Whitley and Joe Walkling in Collapse - a period drama.© Foteini Christofilopoulou. (Click image for larger version)

New Movement Collective – Collapse– a period drama – London

★★★★✰   The performers need the sharpest of reactions to deal with the unexpected, negotiating routes through bemused and bedazzled spectators.

Ekaterina Krysanova and Vladislav Lantratov in Taming of the Shrew.© Dave Morgan. (Click image for larger version)

Bolshoi Ballet – The Taming of the Shrew – London

★★★✰✰   Maillot’s ballet… belongs to Krysanova and Lantratov, who succeed in conveying that Kate and Petruchio are wildly, equally in love, however crassly they treat each other…

Olga Smirnova and Denis Rodkin in Swan Lake.© Foteini Christofilopoulou. (Click image for larger version)

Bolshoi Ballet – Swan Lake – London

★★★✰✰   According to the programme notes for Yuri Grigorovich’s 2001 account of Swan Lake, his Prince Siegfried is a ‘ballet Lohengrin’ – a Knight of the White Swan. The production is all about him.

Olga Smirnova and Danis Rodkin (Kitri & Basil) in Don Quixote.© Foteini Christofilopoulou. (Click image for larger version)

Bolshoi Ballet – Don Quixote – London

★★★★✰   The Bolshoi’s Don Quixote continues to delight for the exuberance and skill of its range of performers, with the corps de ballet and demi-soloists taking pride of place.

Leanne Stojmenov in Alexei Ratmansky's Cinderella.© Jeff Busby. (Click image for larger version)

Australian Ballet – Cinderella – London

★★★✰✰   …the production lurches between down-to-earth Aussie niceness and the designer’s European conceits…

Sterling Hyltin and Amar Ramasar in Symphony in Three Movements.© Paul Kolnik. (Click image for larger version)

New York City Ballet – Apollo, The Four Temperaments, Duo Concertant, Symphony in Three Movements – Paris

★★★★✰   The pleasure, above all, in watching this company is their fearless super-charge of energy and their commitment as the inheritors of Balanchine’s ballets.

Gary Avis and Francesca Hayward in The Invitation.© Dave Morgan, courtesy the Royal Opera House. (Click image for larger version)

Royal Ballet – Obsidian Tear (premiere), The Invitation, Within the Golden Hour – London

★★★★✰   The range of roles shows the Royal Ballet dancers, up-and-coming soloist, established principals and character artists, at their very best.

Tim Hodges (Mr Hyde) in Jekyll & Hyde.© Manuel Harlan. (Click image for larger version)

The McOnie Company – Jekyll and Hyde – London

★★★✰✰   Drew McOnie’s aim in his dance-theatre version of Jekyll and Hyde is to tell a ripping yarn without the use of words. He’s very much a Matthew Bourne disciple…

Gregory Lau in Hans van Manen’s Solo.© Foteini Christofilopoulou. (Click image for larger version)

Nederlands Dans Theater 2 (NDT2) – Schubert, Sad Case, Some Other Time, mutual comfort, Solo, Cacti – London

★★✰✰✰   Hans van Manen’s Solo for three men comes as a blessed relief for its luscious co-ordination and witty response to Bach’s Violin Partita.

Philharmonia Orchestra & Armitage Gone! Dance performing Agon.© Camilla Greenwell Photography. (Click image for larger version)

Philharmonia Orchestra & Armitage Gone! Dance – Agon, Rite of Spring, Symphonies of Wind Instruments – London

★★★✰✰   Esa-Pekka Salonen is conducting London’s Philharmonia Orchestra in a Stravinsky festival, the first concert of which included a collaboration with Karole Armitage’s company on “Agon” – famously originally choreographed by Balanchine…

Thomas Whitehead in Liam Scarlett's Frankenstein.© Dave Morgan, courtesy the Royal Opera House. (Click image for larger version)

Royal Ballet – Frankenstein – London

★★★✰✰   Liam Scarlett treats Mary Shelley’s 1818 gothic horror novel, Frankenstein, as essentially a domestic drama.

DanceTabs © 2017 All Rights Reserved

© All here is copyright DanceTabs and the author concerned. Do not steal our words or pictures please. Thank you.