"Vito Mazzeo" tag
Maria Kochetkova and Joan Boada in Possokhov's Francesca da Rimini.© Erik Tomasson. (Click image for larger version)

San Francisco Ballet – Criss-Cross, Francesca da Rimini, Symphony in Three Movements – San Francisco

Program 7 made me think a lot about this tricky issue of programming because this bill is a weird sandwich made with a delectable gourmet filling between slices of bland Wonder bread.

Lorena Feijoo and Vitor Luiz in Caniparoli's Ibsen's House.© Erik Tomasson. (Click image for larger version)

San Francisco Ballet – Raymonda Act III, Ibsen’s House, Symphonic Dances – San Francisco

The highlight of the program is Lorena Feijóo’s return to the stage in more than one ballet during the evening. After being out on maternity leave for a year …is dancing better than ever.

San Francisco Ballet in Ratmansky's From Foreign Lands.© Erik Tomasson. (Click image for larger version)

San Francisco Ballet – From Foreign Lands, Scotch Symphony, Golden Hour – San Francisco

From Foreign Lands: “This amusing, yet subtle send-up of classical ballet is rewarding in its expertly-shaped choreography, and made all the more appealing by the slight wackiness of the costumes and visual jokes.”

Jennifer Stahl, Garen Scribner and James Sofranko in Possokhov's The Rite of Spring.© Erik Tomasson. (Click image for larger version)

San Francisco Ballet – Guide to Strange Places, Beaux, Rite of Spring – San Francisco

Possokhov’s Rite of Spring is a mixture of mostly good choices with a few that seem rather odd to me.

Yuan Yuan Tan and Damian Smith in Wheeldon's After The Rain.© Erik Tomasson. (Click image for larger version)

San Francisco Ballet – 80th Season Gala Opening – San Francisco

Perhaps the best pas de deux of the evening, judging by the audience reaction, is one from Christopher Wheeldon’s After the Rain.

Sarah Van Patten and Carlos Quenedit in Wheeldon's Number Nine.© Erik Tomasson. (Click image for larger version)

San Francisco Ballet – Trio, RAkU, Voices of Spring, Number Nine – Washington

The mixed bill proved once again that San Francisco Ballet is a dedicated promoter of new work…

HK Ballet in Castrati.© Conrad Dy-Liacco. (Click image for larger version)

Hong Kong Ballet – An International Celebration of Ballet – Hong Kong

Hong Kong Ballet presented a diverse and well-balanced mixed programme in early November, consisting of two premieres and a revival of a major work.

Yuan Yuan Tan and Damian Smith in Wheeldon's Ghosts.© Dave Morgan and courtesy of San Francisco Ballet. (Click image for larger version)

San Francisco Ballet – Programme B: Tomasson, Wheeldon, Page – London

San Francisco’s second programme was better balanced than the first, with contrasting works created for the company within the past two years.

San Francisco Ballet in Balanchine's Divertimento No. 15.© Dave Morgan and courtesy of San Francisco Ballet. (Click image for larger version)

San Francisco Ballet – Programme A: Balanchine, Liang, Wheeldon – London

I loved the way the SFB dancers were so confident with the choreography (of Divertimento No 15), at ease after an understandably tense start.

San Francisco Ballet in Tomasson/Possokhov's Don Quixote. © Erik Tomasson. (Click image for larger version)

San Francisco Ballet – Don Quixote – San Francisco

Kochetkova and Domitro, together and separately, dance extraordinarily well. They don’t have the elusive chemistry that she has with Boada, but they still are very much in tune with each other, both musically and artistically, and make a very satisfying partnership.

San Francisco Ballet in Balanchine's The Four Temperaments. © Erik Tomasson. (Click image for larger version)

San Francisco Ballet – All Balanchine Bill (Program 7) – San Francisco

The sixty-five-year-old The Four Temperaments is now a senior citizen, but not even close to retiring…

Frances Chung and Pascal Molat in Page's Guide To Strange Places. © Erik Tomasson. (Click image for larger version)

San Francisco Ballet – Programs 5 and 6 (Liang/Page premieres) – San Francisco

Calling this ballet a guide (Guide To Strange Places) is not really precise because it’s more like a portal that lets you in and then leaves you on your own to figure out where you are. Whether you have absolutely no sense of direction or can find your way anywhere blindfolded could determine how you explore this terrain

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